New Disquietude podcast episode: music by Lesley Flanigan, Dave Seidel, KMRU, Celia Hollander, and John Hooper; interview with Flanigan; commentary; short essay on reading waveforms. • Disquiet.com F.A.Q.Key Tags: #saw2for33third, #field-recording, #classical, #juntoElsewhere: Twitter, SoundCloud, Instagram

Listening to art. Playing with audio. Sounding out technology. Composing in code. Rewinding the soundscape.

Monthly Archives: April 2021

Creak

A mesostic

                   BeCause this old building  
               is neaRly a 
                    cEntury into its existence
it's developed quite A vocabulary
            with its Knotty wood floors

Update: And again, shortly after I posted this to Twitter, I was rewarded with a remix by Guy Birkin:

Because this old buildinG
       is nearly a centuRy into its existence
              it's develOped quite 
                   a vocAbulary with its 
                       kNotty wood floors
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Disquiet Junto Project 0487: Carillon Quotidian

Assignment: Turn a recurring sound from your life into music.

Each Thursday in the Disquiet Junto group, a new compositional challenge is set before the group’s members, who then have just over four days to upload a track in response to the assignment. Membership in the Junto is open: just join and participate. (A SoundCloud account is helpful but not required.) There’s no pressure to do every project. It’s weekly so that you know it’s there, every Thursday through Monday, when you have the time.

Deadline: This project’s deadline is the end of the day Monday, May 3, 2021, at 11:59pm (that is, just before midnight) wherever you are. It was posted on Thursday, April 29, 2021.

These are the instructions that went out to the group’s email list (at tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto):

Disquiet Junto Project 0487: Carillon Quotidian
Assignment: Turn a recurring sound from your life into music.

This project was developed by Marty Petkovich (aka K Joule) as part of the celebration of the upcoming 500th consecutive weekly Disquiet Junto project.

Step 1: Identify a recurring sound in your daily life that isn’t generally considered musical. Try to locate a sound that you would normally ignore: the hum of the dryer, or the way the car trunk resonates when you drop it closed, the sound your boots make on certain stairs, the sound of the water coming out of the kitchen tap, etc.

Step 2: The goal is to explore the innate musicality of the sound you identified in Step 1. When recording the sound identified in Step 1, please keep in mind the effort may require some production techniques, because you want to try to isolate it as best as possible.

Step 3: Make an original piece of music employing the sample you recorded in Step 2 of the sound you decided upon in Step 1. Transpose the recorded sample and compose a short theme to use as the central voice in your composition. Complete your piece with other instrument lines as needed.

Background: Invented almost 500 years ago, the carillon is one of the first attempts to take a quotidian sound, the bell, and transpose it into a scaled instrument (which comprises a keyboard that mechanically works 23 bells of different sizes). It is also one of the loudest instruments, designed to broadcast music across an entire village. Before the carillon, the most important role of the bell was to announce the hour (functioning at its most basic level) or the beginning or ending of some event, spiritual or otherwise. The carillon instrumentalized the bell, much as samplers can instrumentalize any recorded item. In honor of the impending 500th Disquiet Junto project, this week’s challenge is to revisit the 500-year-old process of taking a common sound that resonates in your life and instrumentalize it in order to craft a piece of music. Your “carillon” should be the central voice in your piece which can then be embellished as you wish with other instrument lines.

Seven More Important Steps When Your Track Is Done:

Step 1: Include “disquiet0487” (no spaces or quotation marks) in the name of your tracks.

Step 2: If your audio-hosting platform allows for tags, be sure to also include the project tag “disquiet0487” (no spaces or quotation marks). If you’re posting on SoundCloud in particular, this is essential to subsequent location of tracks for the creation of a project playlist.

Step 3: Upload your tracks. It is helpful but not essential that you use SoundCloud to host your tracks.

Step 4: Post your tracks in the following discussion thread at llllllll.co:

https://llllllll.co/t/disquiet-junto-project-0487-carillon-quotidian/

Step 5: Annotate your tracks with a brief explanation of your approach and process.

Step 6: If posting on social media, please consider using the hashtag #disquietjunto so fellow participants are more likely to locate your communication.

Step 7: Then listen to and comment on tracks uploaded by your fellow Disquiet Junto participants.

Additional Details:

Deadline: This project’s deadline is the end of the day Monday, May 3, 2021, at 11:59pm (that is, just before midnight) wherever you are. It was posted on Thursday, April 29, 2021.

Length: The length of your finished track is up to you.

Title/Tag: When posting your tracks, please include “disquiet0487” in the title of the tracks, and where applicable (on SoundCloud, for example) as a tag.

Upload: When participating in this project, be sure to include a description of your process in planning, composing, and recording it. This description is an essential element of the communicative process inherent in the Disquiet Junto. Photos, video, and lists of equipment are always appreciated.

Download: It is always best to set your track as downloadable and allowing for attributed remixing (i.e., a Creative Commons license permitting non-commercial sharing with attribution, allowing for derivatives).

For context, when posting the track online, please be sure to include this following information:

More on this 487th weekly Disquiet Junto project — Carillon Quotidian (Assignment: Turn a recurring sound from your life into music) — at: https://disquiet.com/0487/

This project was developed by Marty Petkovich (aka K Joule) as part of the celebration of the upcoming 500th consecutive weekly Disquiet Junto project.

More on the Disquiet Junto at: https://disquiet.com/junto/

Subscribe to project announcements here: https://tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto/

https://llllllll.co/t/disquiet-junto-project-0487-carillon-quotidian/

There’s also a Disquiet Junto Slack. Send your email address to twitter.com/disquiet for Slack inclusion.

The image associated with this project is by Jade, and used thanks to Flickr and a Creative Commons license allowing editing (cropped with text added) for non-commercial purposes:

https://flic.kr/p/2sThNR

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

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Bark

A mesostic

            The Bony old dog's howl
              trAvels only
           so faR as neighbors wail on social
media and the liKe

Update: What a joy. Minutes after I posted this to Twitter, I was rewarded with a remix by Guy Birkin:

The bony old dog's hoWl travels 
                     Only
                    sO 
                     Far as neighbors wail on social media and the like
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Ambience v Ambiance v ?

The barometer over time for words about atmosphere

  1. I would have thought it the opposite (ambiance > ambience).

  2. I would have thought “ambience” on the rise in particular the past few years.

  3. Maybe Google’s Ngram is looking at different sources than I am.

  4. If these two are on the decline, what is on the rise?

. . .

Braulio Agnese noted for me the relative prominence is flipped in Google Trends.

. . .

A friend, Jimmy Kipple, suggested “chill,” and that seems like a good bet, even more right than I’d imagined.

Chill is the word (is the word, is the word that you heard)
It’s got a groove, it’s got a meaning
Chill is the time, is the place, is the motion
Chill is the way we are feeling

. . .

Another friend, Robert Boyd, had a good call: “vibe.” On the one hand, “vibe” is lower than “ambient” or “chill.” On the other, “vibe” is a much closer synonym for “ambience” and “ambiance,” and its rise aligns with their decline. (Vibe’s overall rise in the Ngram, it should be noted, begins almost exactly with the launch, in 1993, of the magazine Vibe.)

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Videos Games Killed Ambient Hyperreality

A sonic subculture on the other side of the screen


YouTube is filled with videos of ambient sound from cities and nature alike. There are walking tours of Notting Hill in London, and still-camera video documents of redwood forests. You can even hop aboard someone’s bike as they cycle around Tokyo, mic to the world, picking up traffic and chatter and wind. Some of these are too good to be true. If your browser finds you in picturesque desert or drenched Amazon rain forest, there’s a good chance the sounds originated elsewhere entirely, perhaps nowhere — which is to say, the nowhere that is an audio technician’s computer, refining idealized sounds of what we think the world sounds like, what the world “should” sound like. Reality is rarely as good as one might hope, especially reality recorded for hours straight without an edit and immediately uploaded to the internet. As for fictional reality, that is something else entirely. Right alongside the audio-video of seaside boardwalks and mountain tops are extracted segments extracted from television, movies, and video games. This one, for example, shows different settings from the video game Cyberpunk 2077, soaking with precipitation, the city streets circled by occasional cars, haunted by solo pedestrians, and flush with enough little sound objects — a honk here, a crossing signal there, the buzz of electricity everywhere, the halfhearted appeal from advertising on repeat — to feel not so much real as dourly welcoming, a false reality that’s arguably all the more real than the hyperreal hillside lake or island paradise, or campsite fire that manages to stay lit for a quarter of a day.

Video originally posted to the Slow Walkthroughs / Video Game Ambience channel at YouTube.

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