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Ylva Lund Bergner Poisons Ears

Her "Euphorbia" works slowly and effectively.

There are many places where ambient music and contemporary classical music collide. Among the more fertile intersections is where the latter is a chamber work, and the collective impression is considerably less than the sum of the various parts. This isn’t to suggest any disappointment, quite the contrary — simply the controlled intensity of many instruments taking considerably limited action for an extended period.

“Euphorbia,” composed by Ylva Lund Bergner and performed by the Curious Chamber Players, is just such a work. It has the attenuated tension of Morton Feldman scoring a Mission: Impossible movie, the mix of chiming strings and droning horns and chattering noisemakers proceeding at a deliberate pace in which the drama is implicit rather than explicit.

The composition’s title, “Euphorbia,” we’re informed by Bergner, is from a poisonous plant in Denmark, where she lives (she’s originally from Sweden). She writes: “It is beautiful and very common. In the piece I wanted to transform the poisounous effect the plant would have one a human into music.” Her music is beautiful and by no means common.

Track originally posted at soundcloud.com/ylva-lund-bergner. Get the album on which it appears at cduniverse.com. More from Bergner at ylvalundbergner.com. More from the Curious Chamber Players at curiouschamberplayers.com and soundcloud.com/curious-chamber-players.

By Marc Weidenbaum

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  • By “Moths Drink the Tears of Sleeping Birds” on February 1, 2016 at 8:20 pm

    […] recent work of chamber music that has its basis in the dark corners of the natural sciences, “Euphorbia,” composed by Ylva Lund Bergner, heard in a performance by the Curious Chamber Players. Her […]

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