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Layers by the River

Video and audio by Jason Richardson

Every week in the Disquiet Junto, there’s a playlist of the contributing musicians’ tracks. That playlist consists of all the tracks submitted on SoundCloud, and thus it doesn’t relate all the tracks completed, because some folks post tracks elsewhere, including Bandcamp and, in the case of the prolific Jason Richardson, YouTube. Each week, not only does Richardson dependably respond to the current prompt, he does so in the form of a video. This week, he did two videos, one of which was his interpretation of the current project — using nature as your metronome — and the other of which took things a very creative and, for his audience, rewarding step further.

He reached back to a much earlier project. In the April 2016 Junto, the compositional prompt, proposed by Brian Crabtree, developer of the Monome suite of hardware and software music tools, recommended a unique artistic technique: you record the same piece of music several times, and then layer them. The deviations between the versions yields a subtle, cloudy flow. So, in Richardson’s video, not only do we hear him playing the part simultaneously in several takes, we also see the various Richardsons overlapping, as well. And since this includes outtakes culled in favor of the prefered single take, we experience, at the end, when Richardson has to move his gear out of the way to let a guy on his motorcycle get across the bridge.

Up above is the layered version. Here, below, is the single take. What Richardson is up to is, inspired by the current Junto project’s instructions, letting the “feeling of the breeze” on his face inform the pace at which he plays:

Videos originally posted to Jason Richardson’s YouTube channel. More from him at bassling.blogspot.com.

By Marc Weidenbaum

Tags: , , / Comments: 2 ]

2 Comments

  1. Jason Richardson
    [ Posted February 15, 2020, at 1:04 pm ]

    Cheers Marc and thanks again for sharing this technique with the Junto community.

    I’ve also made a third video from the recordings, which picks up on our conversation about the palindrome potential in Junto project number this week.

    It uses a reversed take of the arpeggiated guitar and a solo part I attempted, see: https://youtu.be/Y31o8AEEXf8

    • Marc Weidenbaum
      [ Posted February 16, 2020, at 7:52 pm ]

      Oh, very nice. Anyone reading this thread, I recommend proceeding through to the video that Jason mentions directly above.

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