New Disquietude podcast episode: music by Lesley Flanigan, Dave Seidel, KMRU, Celia Hollander, and John Hooper; interview with Flanigan; commentary; short essay on reading waveforms. • Disquiet.com F.A.Q.Key Tags: #saw2for33third, #field-recording, #classical, #juntoElsewhere: Twitter, SoundCloud, Instagram

Listening to art. Playing with audio. Sounding out technology. Composing in code. Rewinding the soundscape.

twitter.com/disquiet: Voice Menus, Göransson, Mann

From the past week

I do this manually each Saturday, usually in the morning over coffee: collating most of the tweets I made the past week at twitter.com/disquiet, which I think of as my public notebook. Some tweets pop up sooner in expanded form or otherwise on Disquiet.com. I’ve found it personally informative to revisit the previous week of thinking out loud. This isn’t a full accounting. Often there are, for example, conversations on Twitter that don’t really make as much sense out of the context of Twitter itself. And sometimes I tweak them a bit, given the additional space. And sometimes I re-order them just a bit.

▰ If you say “human” enough the voice menu eventually gets the point.

▰ Soundtrack: buncha kids on some sorta summer camp stroll walking by while singing loudly in perfect misharmony, muffled by wind and walls and traffic.

▰ Ludwig Göransson is scoring Christopher Nolan’s upcoming film, Oppenheimer. Very much looking forward to it.

▰ From today’s New York Times mini crossword. An across clue: “8 electronica instrument” (5 spaces).

▰ One of the “Physics Cost-Saving Tips” from today’s XKCD:

▰ “It is not on any map. True places never are.”

I’m enjoying Todd Eliot’s Moby Dick (re)read in particular and book blog in general: thelithole.com.

Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson is the 18th novel I’ve finished reading this year. I strive to get into historical fiction but I’m usually left wanting to read more history. I’m not sure I’m moving on to volume two of the Baroque Cycle for a while. Diamond Age and Cryptonomicon remain my favorite Stephenson novels.

By Marc Weidenbaum

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