twitter.com/disquiet: Expanse Sound, Ikea turntable

From the past week

I do this manually each Saturday, usually in the morning over coffee: collating most of the tweets I made the past week at twitter.com/disquiet, which I think of as my public notebook. Some tweets pop up sooner in expanded form or otherwise on Disquiet.com. I’ve found it personally informative to revisit the previous week of thinking out loud. This isn’t a full accounting. Often there are, for example, conversations on Twitter that don’t really make as much sense out of the context of Twitter itself. And sometimes I tweak them a bit, given the additional space. And sometimes I re-order them just a bit.

▰ I love the readymade poetry of the “notable deaths” page on Wikipedia.

  • Russian cosmonaut
  • Egyptian film producer and production manager
  • Moldovan composer
  • Italian hotelier, heart attack

▰ This is some next generation interface that seems to being tested on Twitter. I see it on occasion. Among the weird things about the now five arrows (count ‘em) is the one that seems to mean “I like it” turns red when you click on it, and the red looks more like the Defcon level has gone up.

After a while, even the word ballon starts to look like an arrow.

▰ Based on a recent show at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, I can confirm that seeing an outdoor production of The Tempest during pouring rain qualifies as an immersive theater experience. One of my fellow attendees called it “method viewing.”

▰ I love how much The Expanse focuses attention on how the ships sound. The immediate context for this moment, from the ninth book in the series, is just how much death and destruction is occurring around the protagonists.

▰ IKEA teamed up with Swedish House Mafia to make a turntable and a desk. When you think about it, isn’t Ikea the Swedish House Mafia? (engadget.com)

▰ Been down a rabbit hole for a couple weeks. Apparently YouTube has more on it than live videos of John Fahey and Bill Frisell. Who knew? means seriously. Whew. Just breathtaking stuff, Fahey in 1981.

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