New Disquietude podcast episode: music by Lesley Flanigan, Dave Seidel, KMRU, Celia Hollander, and John Hooper; interview with Flanigan; commentary; short essay on reading waveforms. • Disquiet.com F.A.Q.Key Tags: #saw2for33third, #field-recording, #classical, #juntoElsewhere: Twitter, SoundCloud, Instagram

Listening to art. Playing with audio. Sounding out technology. Composing in code. Rewinding the soundscape.

tag: sound-art

twitter.com/disquiet: Dalton, Kadist, Oblique

From the past week

I do this manually each Saturday, collating recent tweets I made at twitter.com/disquiet, which I think of as my public notebook. Some tweets pop up (in expanded form or otherwise) on Disquiet.com sooner. It’s personally informative to revisit the previous week of thinking out loud.

Gunpowder Milkshake uses the same Karen Dalton song, “Something on Your Mind,” that Mayans MC did this past season, number three. It’s a beautiful track, how her voice always sounds like it’s going to break, and I’ll now always associate it with cinematic ultraviolence. And oh that violin that emerges. It’s by Bobby Notkoff, who played on Joni Mitchell’s For the Roses, and several Crazy Horse records (with and without Neil Young).

▰ Last month, members of the Disquiet Junto music community recorded sounds of fictional insects they had imagined. This past weekend, participants created hybrids by blending the sounds of pairs of those imaginary insects. The playlist menagerie is here: soundcloud.com/disquiet.

▰ Some coordinates:

disquiet.com
soundcloud.com/disquiet
youtube.com/disquiet
instagram.com/dsqt
flickr.com/disquietpxl
tinyletter.com/disquiet
tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto

▰ First burrito at Cancun on Mission in forever

▰ Weighing in at 1,055 pages. See you later.

▰ When I bought the URL and started disquiet.com in 1996, it was named for Pessoa’s Book of Disquiet. More broadly, it was because, unless I’m mistaken, the copyright had run out on the book, so translations could more easily be published. I had several recent ones. Oh yeah, disquiet.com turns 25 in December. The Junto turns 10 in January. Next Thursday is the 500th consecutive weekly Disquiet Junto project. But first I need to post the 499th today. (And in 6 years, it’ll be the 300th anniversary of Ben Franklin’s original Junto.)

▰ The Dune trailer looks epic. It should look epic. It’s Dune. The most promising thing may be that it appears to have a sense of humor. Alternately, the most promising thing is they seem to have ditched the Pink Floyd song.

▰ If you zoom (not Zoom) in and dial the number, you can hear a conversation between Laurie Spiegel and the late Pauline Oliveros. Or you can visit the Kadist (kadist.org) gallery in San Francisco, where the installation (Dial Tone Drone by Aura Satz) is part of the Seeing Sound exhibit. The traveling exhibition is curated by Barbara London, who in 2013 assembled MoMA’s Soundings: A Contemporary Score. Two other artists are featured at Kadist in San Francisco: Marina Rosenfeld and Samson Young. Perhaps to their credit, not one of them is on Twitter, but three of the four are on Instagram, if that’s of interest. The number is 1 (833) 764-1221.

▰ Hit pause and accidentally stumbled on Downton Abbey and Zombies:

▰ Oh, wow. When I posted to Facebook, it triggered the facial recognition, so now it looks like a first person shooter based on the Downton Abbey and Zombies movie:

▰ Really appreciate the Disquiet Junto being featured in this piece at hii-mag.com about internet communities for musicians built around compositional prompts. As one of the Oblique Strategies cards reads: “Define an area as ‘safe’ and use it as an anchor.”

▰ Checklist:

🗹 499th Junto
🗹 ton of work
🗹 long-form writing
🗹 writing that’s me cheating on long-form writing
🗹 gallery review draft
🗹 lunch with friend
☐ email catch-up
🗹 guitar practice
🗹 home cooking
🗹 some exercise
🗹 go offline until Monday

Also tagged , / / Leave a comment ]

If John Cage Rode a Horse

Two from a short series

Tag: / Leave a comment ]

Disquiet Junto Project 0484: A Movable Heart

The Assignment: Transplant the sounds of Chris Kallmyer's wind chimes to a new location.

Each Thursday in the Disquiet Junto group, a new compositional challenge is set before the group’s members, who then have just over four days to upload a track in response to the assignment. Membership in the Junto is open: just join and participate. (A SoundCloud account is helpful but not required.) There’s no pressure to do every project. It’s weekly so that you know it’s there, every Thursday through Monday, when you have the time.

Deadline: This project’s deadline is the end of the day Monday, April 12, 2021, at 11:59pm (that is, just before midnight) wherever you are. It was posted on Thursday, April 8, 2021.

These are the instructions that went out to the group’s email list (at tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto):

Disquiet Junto Project 0484: A Movable Heart
The Assignment: Transplant the sounds of Chris Kallmyer’s wind chimes to a new location.

First, some background: Artist Chris Kallmyer’s “Two hearts are better than one” is a pair of wind chimes, one of which is depicted in this week’s cover image, crisscrossing Los Angeles at the height of the pandemic. Installed at homes for week-long listening sessions, the chimes formed a duet across a city and provided intimate experiences with sound for 16 families sheltering at home. (More at chriskallmyer.com.)

Step 1: Chris has provided us with a recording of the wind chimes, a little over five minutes long. The audio was cleaned up by Alex Hawthorn to maximize the clarity of the chimes themselves, removing much of the background sound, thus situating the chimes in what might be thought of as a platonic space. Access the wav file at dropbox.com.

Step 2: You’ll be continuing the journey of this wind chime. You’ll do this by playing the wav file recording out loud somewhere you choose, and recording the sound of the wind chime in that environment.

Seven More Important Steps When Your Track Is Done:

Step 1: Include “disquiet0484” (no spaces or quotation marks) in the name of your tracks.

Step 2: If your audio-hosting platform allows for tags, be sure to also include the project tag “disquiet0484” (no spaces or quotation marks). If you’re posting on SoundCloud in particular, this is essential to subsequent location of tracks for the creation of a project playlist.

Step 3: Upload your tracks. It is helpful but not essential that you use SoundCloud to host your tracks.

Step 4: Post your tracks in the following discussion thread at llllllll.co:

https://llllllll.co/t/disquiet-junto-project-0484-a-movable-heart/

Step 5: Annotate your tracks with a brief explanation of your approach and process.

Step 6: If posting on social media, please consider using the hashtag #disquietjunto so fellow participants are more likely to locate your communication.

Step 7: Then listen to and comment on tracks uploaded by your fellow Disquiet Junto participants.

Additional Details:

Deadline: This project’s deadline is the end of the day Monday, April 12, 2021, at 11:59pm (that is, just before midnight) wherever you are. It was posted on Thursday, April 8, 2021.

Length: You’d likely keep your track to the original length, but vary as you see fit.

Title/Tag: When posting your tracks, please include “disquiet0484” in the title of the tracks, and where applicable (on SoundCloud, for example) as a tag.

Upload: When participating in this project, be sure to include a description of your process in planning, composing, and recording it. This description is an essential element of the communicative process inherent in the Disquiet Junto. Photos, video, and lists of equipment are always appreciated.

Download: It is always best to set your track as downloadable and allowing for attributed remixing (i.e., a Creative Commons license permitting non-commercial sharing with attribution, allowing for derivatives).

For context, when posting the track online, please be sure to include this following information:

More on this 484th weekly Disquiet Junto project — A Movable Heart (The Assignment: Transplant the sounds of Chris Kallmyer’s wind chimes to a new location) — at: https://disquiet.com/0484/

More on Chris Kallmyer at: chriskallmyer.com.

Major thanks to Alex Hawthorn for support: alexhawthorn.com

More on the Disquiet Junto at: https://disquiet.com/junto/

Subscribe to project announcements here: https://tinyletter.com/disquiet-junto/

Project discussion takes place on llllllll.co: https://llllllll.co/t/disquiet-junto-project-0484-a-movable-heart/

There’s also a Disquiet Junto Slack. Send your email address to twitter.com/disquiet for Slack inclusion.

Image associated with this project is by Pieter Kaufman and used with the artist’s permission.

Also tagged , , , / / Leave a comment ]

Jasmine Guffond Gets the Drop on the Mic

For a new Editions Mego album

Both the album title, Microphone Permission, and the title of its lead track, “Forever Listening,” get at Jasmine Guffond’s interest in surveillance culture. The former is something we grant devices and apps without giving the decision, such as it is, much thought. The latter describes the state of tools, such as smart speakers, we allow so that they can seem to anticipate our needs. These concepts feed, in “Forever Listening,” a droning piece lace with muffled voices and occasionally riddled with something like a shot from a video game.

An accompanying video, by Ilan Katin, uses what appears to be dated footage from a security camera from a store to make its point: we’re being watched at the most mundane moments. If this tense area of study suggests a sense of alarm, Guffond meets that with the sound of one just before the track comes to a quietly vibrating close.

Get the full album at jasmineguffond.bandcamp.com. Video originally posted a the YouTube channel of Ilan Katin. More from Guffond, an Australian based in Berlin, Germany, at jasmineguffond.com.

Also tagged , , , / / Comment: 1 ]

Taxonomy of Speakers at MoMA

At least four categories

Tasty as the sausages may be, sometimes paying attention to how they’re made can be just as enticing, maybe even more.

I spent the afternoon at the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan before heading back home to San Francisco, the close of a somewhat sudden and quick trip to the city. The range of audio speakers throughout the newly redesigned MoMA, their placement and purpose, provided hints at the role sound was intended to play in the varied exhibits.

The museum today is less than ever a staid assembly of neutral zones. Since reopening in late 2019, MoMA is more a refined theme park, the design of adjacent rooms clashing, purposefully, with their neighbors. The paths are circuitous, disorienting, exploratory. The transitions between zones make each successive exhibit you wander through feel less like an autonomous space, and more like it’s in conversation with the places you’ve been through and are headed to.

When you enter a given space, you may hear something, but excepting rooms dedicated to individual works, it can be unclear which piece correlates with the sound. Speakers are everywhere. Room after room you enter has audio; the question becomes: From which of these many pieces in front of me is it emanating? This isn’t a puzzle. It never takes long to sort out. But in the process of untangling several such circumstances, patterns begin to form and cluster, and in turn a taxonomy of the speakers comes into shape.

There are speakers placed within the art in a compelling way. These speakers are visually, structurally, compositionally part of a whole:

There are speakers off to the side or up in a corner, participating but not acknowledged. Their role is, in effect, un-credited. They are infrastructure, not art:

There are invitations to listen — some traditional headphones, others ingenious single-ear devices. The traditional headphones suggest you sit and stay, the single-ear ones that you might dip in and get a sense of the piece:

There is plenty of video that has no sound at all. Some of those pieces, for no readily apparent reason, make the effort, in the accompanying curatorial text, to inform the audience the works are, in fact, silent. One example is this 1985 piece, “Reabracadabra” by the artist Eduardo Kac. It runs on an old Philips Minitel terminal:

And then, after witnessing all these MoMA speakers, there are the pieces with no sound, no electronics at all, but that come to look like speakers, such as this untitled 1957 piece by Hélio Oiticica:

Tag: / Comment: 1 ]